Design for Urban Living

Snapshot #18


Posted on May 19th, by David Bjorngaard in Here/There. No Comments

The traditional Japanese tea house is a humble structure, often set in a garden, that balances concepts of Wabi-Sabi  — the Japanese aesthetic centered on impermanence and imperfection. Hiroshi Sugimoto, the photographer, upturns the idea of this humble structure for the Venice Biennale, creating a glass box set in a pool of Bizazza Tile. Yet this Tea House captures the modern spirit with a mix of materials which are highly reflective and dull, rustic and modern, unexpected and common, durable and fragile, humble and refined.  I am a huge fan of Sugimoto, Wabi-Sabi and Venice…to me this is the perfect storm. Maybe you will agree.

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

The mix of Bizazza Tile (common for use in pools and bathrooms in California), quarried stone, and boulders is a nice material mix.

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

A traditional Tea House has two entrances, one for the host and one for the guest.

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

Asymmetrical layout, and a glimpse of Venice…ah!

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

The traditional entrance is low and small, physically humbling the guest when entering.

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

Hiroshi Sugimoto.

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

Glass Tea House Mondrian, by Hiroshi Sugimoto

Mix of materiality will highlight weathering and decay, a key understanding of the concept Sabi.

Glass Tea House by Hiroshi Sugimoto

David Bjørngaard, May 2106





What do you think?