Design for Urban Living

Trocadero


Posted on July 9th, by David Bjorngaard in Here/There, Inhabit, The Moment. No Comments

This apartment in the Trocadero by Rodolphe Parente is seductive. Interesting use of volumes and color, combined with a mix of herringbone parquet floors, bronze and Calacatta marble create a space that is stylish and really Parisian. It’s also huge by Parisian standards (check out the size of the kitchen). Yet, there are some valuable lessons we can take away, so that you can mix and match to improve your own space.

Use color as a ground, connecting rug and sofa (or chairs). This is an effective way to concentrate color, leaving the rest of a room monochromatic. This is an effective strategy if you have a lot of artwork, or own one colorful piece.

Sofa by Francesco Rota combines with custom round rug, Clam chairs, and great artwork in this living room by Rudolph Parente.

Sofa by Francesco Rota combines with custom round rug, Clam Chairs by Philip Arctander, and great artwork. Furniture is gravitating to the middle of a room, perfect for entertain.

Embrace a view by creating window seating. A banquette at a window encourages hanging out, reading a book, doing work and eating, while providing the best views at day and night. An adjustable light also makes the transition from day-to-night possible, setting the right mood.

Besides the coffered ceiling and herringbone floor, this kitchen by Rodolphe Parente shines with a cubist island, smart furniture and artwork.

Besides the coffered ceiling and herringbone floor, this kitchen shines with a cubist island in marble and bronze, smart furniture and artwork.

Rodolphe Parente kitchen to family room view

Maximize the sense of space by creating custom sized furniture. This maximizes function, and the lack of “gaps” makes the space feel larger. Many vendors allow you to specify the size of furniture…choose a size that fits.

The bookcase expands the opening of the niche, which makes it seem destined. The mirror expands the view and reflects the light in this office by Rodolphe Parente.

The bookcase expands the opening of the niche, which makes it seem destined. The mirror expands the view and reflects the light.

Not all built-in need to be entirely built-in, and recessed lighting no longer need to be fully recessed. Sometimes reality runs up against the dream, which requires accommodation. Here the depth behind the wall isn’t enough for a fully functional built-in wardrobe, so the cabinet pushes out. This is celebrated, not fought, with the use of bronze and fabric doors. The same idea can be applied to medicine cabinets, bookshelves, and night stands.

I like how the headboard is wide enough to embrace the nightstands, while the rug is as wide as the headboard.

I like how the headboard is wide enough to embrace the night stands, while the rug is as wide as the headboard, so your first step in the middle of the night is soft and warm.

The mix of Calacatta Marble and Bronze, in this offset pattern reminiscent of designs by Carlo Scarpa, is smart and modern.

The mix of Calacatta marble and bronze is smart and modern in an offset pattern reminiscent of designs by Carlo Scarpa.

Mirrors, mirrors, mirrors.  Mirrors function to expand space in a small room, and help bring light further into a room. It’s worth the investment. Need I say more?

I like the mix of Calacatta Marble, bronze and the ombre curtains.

The adventurous could make their own ombre curtains, channeling their inner Martha Stewart with a bucket and some dye.

Rodolphe Parente closet

A chair in your dressing room makes all the difference: a place to sit, set out an outfit, hold some dirty clothes. Mirrors are an obvious choice too.

David Bjørngaard, July 2015





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